Symphony d'aere

Slow, silent, omnipresent, ever increasing, more toxic than previously thought, the plastic pollution’s reality bears sobering consequences.
— Claire Le Guern Lytle, When Mermaids Cry: the Great Plastic Tide
Kirsten-Milenko_MG_7184©Clique Photography Sydney.jpg
 
 

Rationale

A piece on the subject of plastic pollution and its presence of interaction within our world. The extent of its touch is beyond anything we as a human race have so far experienced. Like a work of Frankenstein it has determined a life of its own and interacts beyond our grasp of control. We have created substances that have stepped beyond us and no longer need our intervention to have methods of definition within the world. 

This crushing reality must not be a cause for apathy. It should act as a call to action. The world we live in is too intricate and beautiful to allow such measures of carelessness to take way into full and devastating measures of control. The planet is too good for that and we have no right to discard it as we have so far done with the substances that pollute so much of its surface, air and waters. Awareness is key. Awareness toward the loss of humankind's authority over the planet in tandem with our simultaneous dependance on a healthy and well functioning environment. We are part of our environment, completely inseparable from its flux and its flow. What we make becomes entwined with our lives and eventually our bodies. There is no separation. 

Kirsten-Milenko_MG_7188©Clique Photography Sydney.jpg
 
 
"The overwhelming amount and mass of marine plastic debris is beyond visual, made of microscopic range fragmented plastic debris that cannot be just scooped out of the ocean. Slow, silent, omnipresent, ever increasing, more toxic than previously thought, the plastic pollution’s reality bears sobering consequences."

Claire Le Guern Lytle, When Mermaids Cry: the Great Plastic Tide

Instrumentation

The choice leading to scoring this work for wind symphony with a solo violinist was the result of an extended analysis in form and expectation. It began with a re-reading of Aristotle's Poetics and concluded sitting on a beach for three days. 

Initially when we look at the soloist onstage in front of a mass of brass, wood winds and percussion we think - you will be lost. The part is scored to reflect the upper partials of chordal figured composed as though for an organ, with the wind symphony becoming a live mass of breathing organ pipes. The concept behind this choice was to redesign the instrumental body of the wind symphony in ways that are reflective of the resigning humans so often take to our surroundings of nature.

It was important for the ensemble to breathe within specific parameters and the wind symphony was the right medium for this. The violin can occupy a space of punctuation and simultaneous melancholic nostalgia. We have reached a point of no return in many ways with our modern uses of substances. We cannot simply relinquish and forget about objects as we have done for millennia. Everything moves in cycles in strange and unanticipated ways. My instrumentation is a reflection of this idea.  


Symphony d'aere premiered with thanks to the SCM Wind Symphony on the 26th October 2017 featuring solo violinist Annabelle Swainston and conducted by John P. Lynch. It is the second piece in a series of symphonic poetry. 


 
The SCM Wind Symphony conducted by Dr. John P. Lynch perform the world premiere of Kirsten Milenko's Symphony d'aere (2017) featuring Annabelle Swainston. 26 October, 2017 Verbrugghen Hall